MoMA chooses the Fiat 500 Topolino as a work of modern art

 

The Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) has chosen the Fiat 500 “Topolino” as a work of modern art and joins the permanent collection of the MoMA in New York. Fiat calls it, “An extraordinary tribute to the artistic and cultural value of the Italian style icon in the world on its 60th birthday.” An abbreviated press release is posted below.

The model acquired by MoMA will be a 500 F series, the most popular 500 ever, made from 1965 to 1972. Fiat’s “great little car” was an instant success worldwide and the 18 horsepower of its 500cc engine gave it a top speed of 59 mph (95 km/h). Over 4 million units were made from 1957 to 1975, from the new 500 in the late ’50s, on to the Sport and then the D, both more powerful, followed by the F, which holds the record for the number produced, through to the more comfortable L and finally the R.

July 4, 2017 , New York – The best-loved car in Fiat’s history, the icon that made Italians into car owners and worldwide ambassador for the country, celebrates its 60th birthday today with a special event that honors its history and the style and design that made it famous across the globe. Not by chance, it is joining the permanent collection of the MoMA, the Museum of Modern Art, in New York.

“While the Fiat 500 has unquestionably left its mark on automotive history, it is equally true that it has never been just a car,” said Olivier François, Head of FIAT Brand and Chief Marketing Officer, FCA – Global. “In its 60 years of history, the 500 has transcended its material manifestation to enter the collective imagination and become an icon, which has now the honor of being certified by being acquired by MoMA in a tribute to its artistic and cultural value.”

“The Fiat 500 is an icon of automotive history that fundamentally altered car design and production,” said Martino Stierli, The Philip Johnson Chief Curator of Architecture and Design at MoMA. “Adding this unpretentious masterpiece to our collection will allow us to broaden the story of automotive design as told by the Museum.”